Abstract

de Lemos, J. A., Antman, E. M., Giugliano, R. P., Morrow, D. A., McCabe, C. H., Charlesworth, A., Schroder, R., Braunwald, E. Very early risk stratification after thrombolytic therapy with a bedside myoglobin assay and the 12-lead electrocardiogram Am Heart J. 2000;140(3):373-8.

BACKGROUND: Available clinical criteria to estimate prognosis in patients with evolving ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction do not consider the impact of reperfusion therapy and do not incorporate measurement of baseline levels of cardiac serum markers. We evaluated the combination of a baseline myoglobin assay and early (60- to 90-minute) ST resolution for risk stratification after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

METHODS: In a prospective substudy of the Intravenous nPA for Treatment of Infarcting Myocardium Early-II (InTIME-II) trial carried out in 2079 patients, a rapid qualitative assay for myoglobin was performed immediately before thrombolysis. Serial 12-lead electrocardiograms were performed at baseline and 60 to 90 minutes after thrombolysis. ST resolution was categorized as complete (≥70%), partial (30% to <70%), or none (<30%). RESULTS: Mortality rate at 30 days was 3.3% in the 905 patients with a negative baseline myoglobin assay versus 8.9% in the 527 patients with a positive assay (P <.0001). Mortality rate was lowest (2.4%) among the 614 patients with complete ST resolution, intermediate (4.9%) among the 512 patients with partial ST resolution, and highest (8.1%) among the 540 patients with no ST resolution (P <.0001 for trend). In a logistic regression model incorporating other baseline predictors of 30-day mortality rate, both a positive myoglobin assay (relative risk 1.98, 95% confidence interval 1.00-3.90) and ST resolution <70% (relative risk 2.86, 95% confidence interval 1.22-6.69) were independently associated with increased mortality rate. At 30 days, mortality rate was 0.4% among patients with a negative myoglobin assay and complete ST resolution, 4.8% among patients with either a positive myoglobin assay or ST resolution <70%, and 9.6% among those with both a positive myoglobin ratio and ST resolution <70% (P <.001 for trend).

CONCLUSIONS: Within 90 minutes after administering thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction, clinicians can determine the risk for death at the patient's bedside with a hand-held myoglobin assay and 2 serial 12-lead electrocardiograms. A strategy using these 2 simple, rapid, and inexpensive tests may facilitate triage after thrombolytic therapy.

Trial: